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Asthma and Smoker’s Lung: Dry airways play a key role

01.04.2008
In animal studies, research team from Heidelberg and the US detects a common mechanism with lung damage in cystic fibrosis

Dry airways may not only play a central role in the development of the in-herited lung disease cystic fibrosis, but also in much more common ac-quired chronic lung diseases such as asthma and smoker’s lung, the ciga-rette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This is the conclusion reached by scientists at Heidelberg University Hospital under the direction of Assistant Professor Dr. Marcus Mall from the Department of Pediatrics at Heidelberg University Hospital and Professor Dr. Richard Boucher of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In ani-mal studies, they found that insufficient hydration of the airway surfaces leads to pathologies typical of chronic obstructive lung diseases in humans.

 

Thus, these findings point to a new approach for the treatment of these diseases, which are listed by the World Health Organization WHO as the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. There are currently no causal therapies available for treating these diseases; only the symptoms such as shortness of breath and oxygen deficiency can be treated. The results of the study have now been published in the “American Journal of Respira-tory and Critical Care Medicine”.

 

Cystic fibrosis gene causes airways to dry out and thickens mucus

 

In the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis, which affects about 8,000 people in Germany (about 80,000 people in the Western world), a defective gene causes a change in the transport of salt and water across the mucosal sur-faces in the lungs, the intestine and other organs, and thus produce a change in the composition of the secretions.  

 

 
Using a mouse model he developed, Dr. Mall succeeded in proving a direct relationship between the defective gene and development of lung disease – certain sodium channels on the surface of airway cells that are respon-sible for the resorption of salt and water are “hyperactive”. The cells ab-sorb too much fluid, causing the airway surfaces to dry out. This gives rise to thick “dry” mucus that cannot be cleared.  As a consequence, the respi-ratory tract gets clogged with mucus – the lungs cannot be cleaned effec-tively of inhaled allergens, toxins and pathogens, giving rise to chronic pulmonary inflammation and respiratory insufficiency. 

 

Dry airways lead to allergic inflammation, chronic bronchitis and emphysema 

 

The research team from Heidelberg and the US has now for the first time studied the spontaneous course of lung disease caused by dehydration of airway surfaces in mice from birth to adulthood. “We found changes that are not only typical for cystic fibrosis, but also for other chronic obstructive lung diseases such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema,” re-ports Dr. Mall, head of the Heidelberg Cystic Fibrosis Center and also head of a research program funded by a Marie Curie Excellence Grant from the European Union. 

 

In young mice, overly dry airways lead to allergic airway inflammation  - characterized by an increase in specific white blood cells, the eosinophils - typically seen in asthma, a disease that affects every tenth child in Ger-many. Subsequently, adult mice gradually develop chronic bronchitis (dominated by neutrophils), and emphysema, i.e. the destruction of the small alveoli in the lungs that are responsible for the exchange of oxygen between air and blood. These changes are typical for lung disease caused by exposure to cigarette smoke.


 
 
Improved hydration through sodium channel blockers?

 

The researchers conclude that dehydrated airway surfaces could play a key role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in hu-mans. These results indicate that improving hydration of airway surfaces and thus mucus clearance of the lungs, for example by blocking the so-dium channels in the cells of the respiratory tract, could be a successful strategy for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases of different etiologies. The Heidelberg research team now wants to test the benefits of this new therapeutic approach in animals.

 


Contact:
PD Dr. med. Marcus Mall
Head of Cystic Fibrosis Center
Group Leader Research Group Cystic Fibrosis / Chronic Airway Disease
Department of Pediatrics III
Im Neuenheimer Feld 153
D-69120 Heidelberg
Tel.: +49-6221/56-8840
Fax:  +49-6221/56-8806
Email: Marcus.Mall@med.uni-heidelberg.de

 

Prof. Dr. Richard C. Boucher
Cystic Fibrosis/Pulmonary Research and Treatment Center, School of Medicine
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
7011 Thurston Bowles Building
Chapel Hill, NC 27599–7248, USA
Tel. +1-919-966-1077
Email: rboucher@med.unc.edu

 

For more information on the Internet:

 

www.klinikum.uni-heidelberg.de/Forschergruppe-Zystische-Fibrose-Chronische-Atemwegserkrankungen.100620.0.html

 

 
Literature:
Mall MA, Harkema JR, Trojanek JB, Treis D, Livraghi A, Schubert S, Zhou Z, Kreda SM, Tilley SL, Hudson EJ, O'Neal WK, Boucher RC.: Development of chronic bron-chitis and emphysema in beta-epithelial Na+ channel-overexpressing mice. Am J Respir Crit Care Med Vol 177. pp 1–13, 2008

(The original article may be requested from the press office of Heidelberg
University Hospital at contact@med.uni-heidelberg.de)

 

 
Requests by journalists:
Dr. Annette Tuffs
Head of Public Relations and Press Department
University Hospital of Heidelberg and
Medical Faculty of Heidelberg
Im Neuenheimer Feld 672
D-69120 Heidelberg
Germany
phone: +49 6221 / 56 45 36
fax: +49 6221 / 56 45 44
e-mail: annette.tuffs(at)med.uni-heidelberg.de

 

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